FanPost

Some Clarification is in Order - Off-Season Stats: Broncos Offense, a History

Some Clarification is in Order - Off-Season Stats: Rookie Quarterbacks

Some Clarification is in Order - Off-Season Stats: Rookie Wide Receivers

In this segment I wanted to look at how the offense of the Broncos has changed over the seasons and as coaches have come and gone. This will cover how the team moved the ball as well as how the team scored, along with efficiency as well. This will be looking at each coaches time here and how often they ran, passed, and scored in those two ways. Well, lets jump.

Moving the Ball, a History:

This section will deal with how the Broncos moved the ball, how often they did it, and the ratio between running and passing plays. Let's begin with the table, it will list each coach, broken down by season, and look at: passing and rushing attempts, passing and rushing yards, and a ratios between rushing and passing attempts and a ratio dealing with rushing and passing yards. For example, in 1983, Reeves the was the head coach, we passed the ball 499 times and ran it 471 times, so we have a ratio of 1.06 passes per run. But another factor recorded here is the yards, we had 3466 passing yards and 1784 rushing yards, so that would be a ratio of 1.94 passing yards to 1 rushing yard. That means that passing was 94% more often used to move the ball than running was that season. Whereas in 2003, the team had a yardage ratio of 1.13 passing yards to 1 rushing yard, a more even balance of moving the ball.

By having these two ratios we can see how often they attempted to run or pass the ball, and how often they succeeded doing one or the other. I realize it's a bit complicated, but it makes sense once we get to the table.:

Year

Passing attps.

Passing yards

Rushing attps.

Rushing yards

Ratio yards (pass/rush)

Ratio attps. (pass/rush)

Reeves

1983

499

3466

471

1784

1.94

1.06

1984

475

3116

508

2076

1.50

0.94

1985

617

3952

497

1851

2.14

1.24

1986

549

3811

455

1678

2.27

1.21

1987

530

3874

510

1970

1.97

1.04

1988

581

3941

464

1815

2.17

1.25

1989

474

3352

554

2092

1.60

0.86

1990

527

3671

462

1872

1.96

1.14

1991

459

3310

507

2015

1.64

0.91

1992

473

3312

403

1500

2.21

1.17

Avg.

518.4

3580.5

483.1

1865.3

1.94

1.08

Phillips

1993

553

4061

468

1693

2.40

1.18

1994

626

4383

431

1470

2.98

1.45

Avg.

589.50

4222.00

449.50

1581.50

2.69

1.32

Shanahan

1995

549

4260

440

1995

2.14

1.25

1996

536

3662

525

2362

1.55

1.02

1997

513

3704

520

2378

1.56

0.99

1998

491

3808

525

2468

1.54

0.94

1999

554

3419

465

1864

1.83

1.19

2000

569

4243

516

2311

1.84

1.10

2001

511

2940

481

1877

1.57

1.06

2002

554

3824

457

2266

1.69

1.21

2003

479

2969

543

2629

1.13

0.88

2004

521

3999

534

2333

1.71

0.98

2005

465

3227

542

2539

1.27

0.86

2006

454

2799

488

2152

1.30

0.93

2007

515

3584

429

1957

1.83

1.20

2008

620

4471

387

1862

2.40

1.60

Avg.

523.64

3636.36

489.43

2213.79

1.72

1.08

McDaniels

2009

558

3627

440

1836

1.98

1.27

2010

580

4038

398

1544

2.62

1.46

Avg.

569.00

3832.50

419.00

1690.00

2.30

1.36

 

Review:

So what did I find, well Wade Phillips actually ran the most pass heavy offense Elway played in, Reeves came in second, and Shanahan actually came in third. Actually, you remember those two Super Bowl years, we actually ran more rushing plays then passing plays those seasons. Shanahan and Reeves were almost identical in their ratio, both in attempts and yards, well actually, Reeves had a better passing yards ratio then Shanahan did. Shanahan had a much higher average yards in both rushing and passing, but the average ratio actually went down. McD ran a very pass heavy offense, no surprise, but even when he tried to run the ball, it wasn't very successful, partly due to a young/old running back corp and a patchwork offensive line.

This table is purely a look at how the offense moved the ball, and it looks like it has largely been a passing team, but when it really mattered, 1997 and 1998, we ran it more then we passed it. Maybe that says something about the future...

Scoring, a History:

This next table will look at how the team scored. It will cover how many passing and rushing touchdowns there were that season, and will look at how often either scored on a passing or rushing attempt. By examining the past this way, we can see how often the team tried scoring passing or running the ball, and if they were a goal line rushing or passing team.

For example, 1983, we had 17 passing touchdowns and 15 rushing touchdowns, that's a ratio of 1.13 passing touchdowns for every rushing touchdown. Now another key statistic here is the ratio of touchdown per attempt, which is converted into a percentage. In 1983, for every passing attempt, we had a 3.41% chance of scoring a touchdown, and for every rushing attempt, we had a 3.18% chance of scoring. Now in 2002, it was flipped with the running attack having a better chance to score then the passing offense.

Now obviously there are other factors at play here, but it gives one a feel for how each season went and what parts of the team ran effectively.

Year

Passing TD's

Passing TD's/attp

Rushing TD's

Rushing TD's/attp

Passing TD's/Rushing TD ratio

Reeves

1983

17

3.41%

15

3.18%

1.13

1984

22

4.63%

12

2.39%

1.83

1985

23

3.73%

20

4.02%

1.15

1986

22

4.01%

17

4.40%

1.29

1987

24

4.53%

18

3.53%

1.33

1988

24

4.13%

13

2.80%

1.85

1989

21

4.43%

15

2.71%

1.40

1990

15

2.85%

19

4.11%

0.79

1991

13

2.83%

16

3.16%

0.81

1992

16

3.38%

11

2.73%

1.45

Avg.

19.7

3.79%

15.6

3.30%

1.30

Phillips

1993

27

4.88%

13

2.78%

2.08

1994

18

2.88%

19

4.41%

0.95

Avg.

22.5

3.88%

16

3.59%

1.51

Shanahan

1995

27

4.98%

14

3.18%

1.93

1996

26

4.85%

20

3.81%

1.30

1997

27

5.26%

18

3.46%

1.50

1998

32

6.52%

26

4.95%

1.23

1999

16

2.89%

13

2.80%

1.23

2000

28

4.92%

21

4.07%

1.33

2001

26

5.09%

7

1.46%

3.71

2002

21

3.79%

21

4.60%

1.00

2003

19

3.97%

20

3.68%

0.95

2004

27

5.18%

13

2.43%

2.08

2005

18

3.87%

25

4.61%

0.72

2006

20

4.41%

12

2.46%

1.67

2007

21

4.08%

10

2.33%

2.10

2008

25

4.03%

15

3.88%

1.67

Avg.

23.8

4.56%

16.8

3.41%

1.60

McDaniels

2009

21

3.76%

9

2.05%

2.33

2010

25

4.31%

13

3.27%

1.92

Avg.

23

4.04%

11

2.66%

2.13

 

Review:

Now one thing that stood out to me was how effective it was to score by passing the ball sometimes because the running game struggled that season and how quickly things changed the next season. Another thing I noted was that McDaniel's offense was actually fairly effective at scoring through the air, more so then during the Phillips or Reeves era, but struggled mightily when trying to score on the ground. We already knew short-yardage situations we a problem, but we didn't struggle scoring while passing these past couple seasons, but a piss-poor run game really hurts a team in goal line situations.

This team has changed with each coach, Reeves using a pass heavy offense (even if we don't remember it that way), Shanahan and Phillips running more balanced offenses, and McDaniels returning to the pass heavy offense. But even within each coach there was fluctuation, as players come and go, as injuries set in, teams have to change. One of the biggest revelations to me though was that the best years this team had, we weren't a gunslinging team, we didn't pass a lot, we were balanced, and if we want regain that glory, we need to remember there is more to this team then just the QB, and we need a balanced team to win another ring.

Next time on Some Clarification is in Order - Off-Season Stats: Running Backs

This is a Fan-Created Comment on MileHighReport.com. The opinion here is not necessarily shared by the editorial staff of MHR

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join Mile High Report

You must be a member of Mile High Report to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Mile High Report. You should read them.

Join Mile High Report

You must be a member of Mile High Report to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Mile High Report. You should read them.

Spinner

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9341_tracker