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Terrell Davis makes his case for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in exclusive interview

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Terrell Davis is serving as Gillette Deodorant’s ambassador as the slurry of football activity, from the college bowls to the Super Bowl, draw nearer. "As an analyst on the NFL Network, Gillette Clear Gel helps him get through it all, no sweat."

As part of his campaign to promote Gillette Deodorant, Terrell Davis graciously took a few minutes to sit down with yours truly and offer Mile High Report his perspective on the HOF, the 97-98 Super Bowl teams, and his career.

"Good afternoon Mr. Davis, my name is Mike Gomez. I write under the name 'Bronco Mike' for Mile High Report which is a fan blog that covers the Denver Broncos. Thank you very much for taking the time to speak with us today"

If I'm the HOF committee and you have to make an argument on why you belong, what would it be? Make your pitch.

"I would probably bring the case, you mention, based on the big moment. I've had one of the greatest postseason records in the history of the game. To me it's a question about longevity or impact.  Is it the longevity or the impact a player makes? If you base it on longevity then the conversation is over. But if you look at my career there's nothing else I could have accomplished. Look at my numbers, I think I averaged 142 yards per game in the postseason. Go back and look at the big moments, when the games were at stake my performances speak for themselves regular season and postseason. You have the tape, watch the tape--watch the games you'll see that I belong."

What drove your offensive line to dominate game in and game out?

"Our success came from how we worked together. We had a system that worked to our strengths. What they were trying to do was trying to get you to run lateral. If they could get a big person moving laterally, you take his strength away. It wasn't about brute strength. It was about using the skillset of our players."

Do you regret the way your career ended?

"I have no regrets whatsoever. I don't want to change anything because I feel if you change one part it takes away from another. For me, I didn't leave the game wanting to win a championship--There's a lot of guys that play the game and don't get a chance to win a championship, so I'm at peace I got to experience that."

Thank you for your time and candor Mr. Davis, Broncos Country loves you!

My Take

For those that submitted questions, I did the best I could. In the end, the phone interview was shortened from what was originally expected and I was told from the onset that I would have time to ask three questions. I chose the ones I felt would be best for the interview.

On a personal note, Terrell Davis is a class act. I really wish I would have had more time to speak with him. This may have been a platform for him to promote his product, but at the same time he was extremely sincere and engaged while responding to my questions.

As far as his answers, it becomes clear that winning a championship was the defining moment of his career. The MVP's, the records, the 2k season, all of those are ancillary accomplishments to winning the Super Bowl.

It was amazing hearing him address the HOF question and he nailed it. What has kept him out is longevity, and he makes it clear that if the HOF is about nothing more than longevity, he will never make it.What he pleads with the committee to do however is look at the body of his work--albeit shortened due to injury, and realize that from start to finish, Davis performed at the very highest level both in the regular season and the post season.

To be able to look at his seven year career and realize "gee I couldn't have accomplished any more" should be the only evidence the HOF committee needs to finally acknowledge that Terrell Davis does indeed belong in the HOF.

When it comes to team, Terrell acknowledges that the 97-98 teams were a perfect match of the right talent married with the right system. You have a smaller line? Zone block. Get bigger guys moving laterally and take away their straight line strength. Give your strong armed quarterback the opportunity to operate in a system that is tailor made for high percentage, high impact throws. It was all about using the skillset of the players on the roster.

To me, it's funny to hear people assess the Super Bowl teams and call them smashmouth. Back then, because of the smaller line and zone blocking system, the Broncos offense was considered "finesse."

Look at my career-there’s nothing else I could have accomplished. -Terrell Davis

Terrell Davis career accomplishments

- 3 time Pro Bowler (1996-1998)

- 3 time 1st team All-Pro (1996-1998)

- 2 time NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1996, 1998)

- 1998 NFL MVP

- Super Bowl XXXII MVP

- 2 time Super Bowl Champion (XXXII, XXXIII)

- NFL 1990's All-Decade Team

- 2,000 Rushing Yard Club

- Denver Broncos 50th Anniversary Team

From 1995-1998 in the regular season, Terrell Davis

- Averaged 335 carries per season

- Gained 7,594 yards from scrimmage (1898 yards per season)

- Scored 61 touchdowns

- Recorded 31-100 yard rushing games

After his injury early in 1999, Davis played in 13 more regular season games from 1999-2001.

From 1995-1998 in the playoffs, Terrell Davis

- Averaged 142.5 yards per game (8 games)

- Gained 1271 yards from scrimmage (158 per game)

- Scored 12 touchdowns

- Recorded 7-100 yard rushing games, including a record setting seven straight from 1997-1998.

Playoff records compared to other modern day HOF running backs

Player

G

Rush

R

Yards

R

A

R

TD

A

Rec

R

Yards

R

A

TD

Tot

R

Marcus Allen

16

267

5

1247

5

5.04

2

11

4

53

2

530

2

10.0

2

13

3

Jim Brown

4

66

15

241

15

3.65

12

1

10

8

10

99

11

12.38

1

2

8

Earl Campbell

6

135

13

420

13

3.11

14

4

7

5

11

45

13

9.00

0

4

7

Larry Csonka

12

225

7

891

8

3.96

10

9

5

4

12

26

14

6.50

1

10

5

Eric Dickerson

7

148

12

724

10

4.89

3

3

8

19

9

91

12

4.79

1

4

7

Tony Dorsett

17

302

4

1383

4

4.58

4

9

5

46

5

403

5

8.76

1

10

5

Marshall Faulk

12

165

11

602

12

3.65

12

6

2

52

3

519

3

9.98

2

8

6

Franco Harris

19

400

1

1556

2

3.89

11

16

1

51

4

504

4

9.88

1

17

2

Curtis Martin

10

182

9

795

9

4.37

6

8

6

37

6

305

7

8.24

0

8

6

Walter Payton

9

180

10

632

11

3.51

13

2

9

22

7

178

8

9.08

0

2

8

Barry Sanders

6

91

14

386

14

4.24

8

1

10

21

8

111

10

5.29

0

1

9

Emmitt Smith

17

349

2

1586

1

4.54

5

19

1

46

5

342

6

7.43

2

21

1

Thurman Thomas

21

339

3

1442

3

4.25

7

16

2

76

1

672

1

8.84

5

21

1

John Riggins

9

251

6

996

7

3.97

9

12

3

6

13

45

13

7.50

0

12

4

Terrell Davis

8

204

8

1140

6

5.59

1

12

3

19

9

131

9

6.89

0

12

4

Terrell Davis Playoff career averages vs. other modern day HOF running backs

Player

G

Rush

A/G

R

Yards

A/G

R

TD

A/G

R

Marcus Allen

16

267

16.7

11

1247

77.9

8

11

0.69

8

Jim Brown

4

66

16.5

12

241

60.3

14

1

0.25

13

Earl Campbell

6

135

22.5

3

420

70.0

11

4

0.67

9

Larry Csonka

12

225

18.8

8

891

74.3

9

9

1.17

4

Eric Dickerson

7

148

20.1

6

724

103.4

3

3

0.43

12

Tony Dorsett

17

302

17.8

10

1383

81.4

6

9

0.53

10

Marshall Faulk

12

165

13.8

15

602

50.2

15

6

0.50

11

Franco Harris

19

400

21.1

4

1556

81.9

5

16

0.84

5

Curtis Martin

10

182

18.2

9

795

79.5

7

8

0.80

6

Walter Payton

9

180

20.0

7

632

70.2

10

2

0.22

14

Barry Sanders

6

91

15.2

14

386

64.3

13

1

0.17

15

Emmitt Smith

17

349

20.5

5

1586

93.3

4

19

1.12

3

Thurman Thomas

21

339

16.1

13

1442

68.7

12

16

0.76

7

John Riggins

9

251

27.9

1

996

110.7

2

12

1.33

2

Terrell Davis

8

204

25.5

2

1140

142.5

1

12

1.50

1

He Belongs