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Broncos' Chris Harris Jr. tops Richard Sherman to rank No. 1 in PFF's coverage rankings

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Denver's Chris Harris Jr. beat out Seattle's Richard Sherman to rank as PFF's No. 1 cornerback in 2014.

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Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

It's no secret that Denver's Chris Harris Jr. was the top-ranked cornerback in 2014.

The bland stats (things like tackles and interceptions) don't tell the whole story. Advanced stats (things like coverage snaps and QB ratings against) help breakdown how good a CB really is.

On Monday, ProFootballFocus.com revealed some Signature Cornerback Stats:

Chris Harris Jr. of the Denver Broncos stands clear atop the rankings with a hugely impressive 0.57 YPCS score. (...) Harris was also moved about, spending 40% of his snaps covering the slot, however his YPCS performance inside (0.57) matched precisely his performance on the outside (0.57). Harris allowed just 7.7 yards per catch, the best mark among starting corners, and completed the season with a positive coverage grade in every game.

Kevin Connaghan wrote that Harris had a "remarkable" year, which is no surprise considering that he was PFF's No. 1 ranked CB in 2014.

Below is how Harris stacked up against PFF's top five CBs last season:

Rank

Name

Team

Coverage snaps

Yards

NFL QB Rating

Yards/Cover Snap

1

Chris Harris Jr.

DEN

623

356

47.8

0.57

2

Richard Sherman

SEA

552

422

48.4

0.76

3

Josh Norman

CAR

379

291

53.2

0.77

4

Demetrius McCray

JAX

432

339

81.0

0.78

5

Corey Graham

BUF

408

344

57.0

0.84

Perhaps the most impressive stat above is Harris's allowed quarterback rating. QBs throwing against Harris posted an average rating of 47.8 in 2014. For comparison, consider Peyton Manning's 101.5 rating from a year ago.

Despite playing 71 more coverage snaps than Seattle's Sherman, Harris allowed fewer yards and a lower QB rating. Sherman recorded 4 interceptions in 2014. Harris recorded 3 for a third consecutive season.

Harris is, as Connaghan noted above, also more versatile than Sherman. In January's Pro Bowl game, Harris played inside, outside, and safety—all three positions in the secondary. Sherman only plays on the left side of the field.

Aqib Talib, who plays across from Harris, tied for No. 11 on the list, allowing .98 yards per snap.

Harris is not outspoken, which may be why he flies under the radar. But a loud mouth is not a requirement to being a standout cornerback.

Harris is as good as they come, and he has the stats to prove it.